Great Sandy National Park

Mangrove Boardwalk Circuit, Great Sandy National Park, Ezra Patchett / Courtesy of Tourism Queensland
Barbecue Caravan Disabled Drinking water Fishing Shower Swimming Toilets Watersports Wildflowers Wildlife Aboriginal site Accommodation Camping area Four-wheel drive touring Information Picnic area Ranger Walking

Introduction

Great Sandy National Park encompasses World Heritage–listed Fraser Island, the largest sand island in the world; nearby Woody Island; and Cooloola on the mainland. Fraser has beautiful beaches, giant dunes, lush rainforests, crystal-clear creeks and freshwater lakes while Cooloola, and the wilderness area of Woody Island, offer a scenic experience among open forests and fringing mangroves, placid waterways and coloured sands.

Fraser Island, the most well-known section of the park, is the biggest island off Australia’s east coast. Woody Island lies in the Great Sandy Strait. The Cooloola section protects the headwaters of the Noosa River and the largest remnant of coastal vegetation on southern Queensland’s mainland.

Fact file

Access

Cooloola: from Noosa via 4WD or boat. Fraser Island: from Rainbow Beach to Inskip Point then via vehicular barges; or passenger launches, aircraft or private boats; 4WD only on island. Woody Island: by private boat only.

Best season

All seasons

Location

200 km north of Brisbane (Cooloola); 300 km north of Brisbane or 40 km east of Hervey Bay and Maryborough (Fraser Island); 5 km east of Hervey Bay (Woody Island)

Park information

NPRSR 13 7468

Permits

Vehicle permit required for Fraser Island and Cooloola; camping permit and fees apply; bookings essential

Size

220 000 ha (Fraser Island 184 000 ha; Cooloola 56 000 ha)

Visitor information

Gympie (07) 5483 6411

Hervey Bay (07) 4125 9855

Noosa (07) 5430 5020

Featured Activities in the National Park

  • See Fraser Island’s coloured sands on eastern beach

    Visit the beautiful freshwater pools on Fraser Island

    Paddle a canoe along the Noosa River

    Take a boat tour through Cooloola’s everglades

See Also

A look at the past

Fraser Island was originally known as Great Sandy Island. Although first sighted by James Cook in 1770, then explored by Matthew Flinders in 1802, it was Eliza Fraser’s rescue from the island in 1836 that has become the island’s most famous piece of European history. The logging of forests began on the island in 1863, continuing until the early 1990s. The mid-20th century saw small-scale mining for heavy minerals such as rutile and zircon then in the 1960s sandmining, forestry and future development became increasingly controversial, both on Fraser Island and the Cooloola coast. The conservationists finally won the battle, paving the way for the island’s listing as a World Heritage area in 1992.

Some scattered pastoral activity took place in Cooloola in the 1850s but it was short-lived. Logging began along the Noosa River in 1864 and along Kin Kin Creek in 1865. Queensland kauri logs, cut from the northern parts of Cooloola, formed the bulk of supplies for the Dundathu sawmill near Maryborough for around thirty years. In 1870 a sawmill was established on Lake Cootharaba to reap the giant cedar trees along the Noosa River. The 1867 Gympie gold rush caused a brief flurry of mining activity but by the end of the 1800s most timber-getting had ceased. After its resurgence in the mid-20th century, and the subsequent battle over the environment, Cooloola National Park was declared in 1975.

Aboriginal culture

The Indigenous groups living on Fraser Island and the adjacent mainland were members of the Butchulla nation. In the 1860s the island became a quarantine and immigration station for ships bringing in supplies and men to the nearby goldfields at Gympie, heralding the dispossession of tribal lands. The Aboriginal tribes of the Cooloola area were the Dulingbara and Kabi, who were virtually wiped out by diseases introduced by Europeans arriving in the area from the late 1840s onwards.

In 1897 the Bogimbah mission was set up on Fraser and the remaining Butchulla were incarcerated there (their numbers had been reduced from around 2000 when Europeans arrived to less than 400). In 1904 the mission closed and most of the people were moved to Yarrabah near Cairns. Middens, artefact scatters, stone tools, scarred trees and campsites on Fraser Island are reminders of the original inhabitants. Today descendants of the Butchulla in Hervey Bay and on Fraser have a strong affiliation to the land.

Natural features

Fraser Island is famous for its giant dunes, some reaching 230 metres high, and its magnificent sand cliffs – coloured yellow, brown, orange and red by centuries of iron oxides leaching down into the sands. Giant sand blows, the mobile dunes that continually move and regenerate, are a feature of the landscape, with the Knifeblade Sandblow the largest. The island is also distinguished by its 40 perched dune lakes, of which Lake Boomanjin, at 200 hectares, is the largest in the world. Ringed by white sandy beaches, the water in these freshwater lakes varies in colour, from the sparkling blue of Lake McKenzie to the reddish-brown of Lake Boomanjin, stained by tannins leached from the surrounding plants. Regardless of colour, the water is some of the purest drinking water in the world.

Cooloola’s varied landscape has the magnificent sweep of the 50-kilometre Teewah Beach, backed by high sand dunes, mangrove-lined waterways, forest, heath, some perched freshwater dune lakes and coastal lakes. The scenic waterways of the upper Noosa River are one of the area’s most outstanding features. Here are the Noosa everglades, where tannins from paperbarks and bloodwoods colour the waters a dark red–black. As a consequence, the reflections of straggly swamp box, bloodwood trees and ferns that fringe the river are extraordinary.

Native plants

Fraser Island is the only place in the world where tall rainforest grows in sand. In Yidney Scrub huge Queensland kauri pines dominate the rainforest while Pile Valley has rough-barked satinays, some more than 1000 years old. Elsewhere there is brush box and hundreds of airy piccabeen palms, vines and ferns. Threatened and primitive plant species find refuge around the lakes and remnant heathlands – the island boasts the most extensive wallum heath remnants in Queensland. Eli Creek, a large freshwater stream, is fringed with pandanus.

Cooloola supports open forests with blackbutts and tallowwoods, paperbark forests and woodlands around its lakes and wetlands, rainforest, and coastal heaths that provide magnificent wildflower displays in spring, including red and yellow Christmas bells, pink boronia, wedding bush and fragile native orchids.

Wildlife

Few large native animals live on Fraser Island. Apart from the humpback whales that frequent Hervey Bay from July to November, most of the 25 mammals recorded are small and include nocturnal residents such as brushtail possums, sugar gliders and flying-foxes. Wild dingoes, unlike those on the mainland that have interbred with domestic dogs, are genetically pure. Island birds (around 200 species) include Australian king-parrots, yellow-tailed black-cockatoos, sulphur-crested cockatoos, kingfishers, honeyeaters, robins and white-bellied sea-eagles.

Dugongs inhabit the waters off the south-west coast, while bottlenose dolphins are sometimes seen during the barge crossing. Freshwater turtles live in the lakes; Krefft’s river turtle is often seen floating about near the edge of Lake Allom. The swamps are a refuge for acid frogs, so-called for their resilience in the highly acidic waters of the wetlands.

In Cooloola, again most wildlife is small in size. Dingoes patrol the whole park while platypuses live in the upper reaches of the river. Eastern grey kangaroos are sometimes sighted on the grasslands in the north-west. Ground parrots and acid frogs are vulnerable species, while among the more unusual creatures is the second largest cockroach in the world. The sand monitor is often seen stretched out in the sun along low-lying logs beside the river.

In the open forests sulphur-crested cockatoos and kingfishers are prolific, while the rainforest resounds with the calls of pigeons and whipbirds. Brush-turkeys are a more common sight, scratching around amid the leaf litter. Along the coast and estuaries you are sure to see kites, white-bellied sea-eagles, pied oyster-catchers and majestic pelicans. There is a bird hide at the northern end of picturesque Lake Cootharaba, at the Sir Thomas Hiley Centre near Kinaba Island.

Introduction

Before visiting Great Sandy National Park, stop at the QPWS Great Sandy Information Centre in Tewantin for vehicle permits and information on walks and picnic areas within the park. In holiday periods, there are slide shows, ranger-led tours by spotlight and guided walks on Fraser Island. Swimming in the sea or the Great Sandy Strait is not advised as the beaches are not patrolled and the currents are wild and dangerous. Sharks are also common and bluebottles are prevalent during northerly winds. Swimming is possible in the freshwater lakes on Fraser Island – Lake McKenzie is an ideal spot. Vistors to Fraser Island's west coast should be aware that there have been several credible crocodile sightings in the area. There are severe fines for feeding dingoes or leaving food or rubbish where it may attract them; visitors should be aware that these are wild animals and there have been fatal attacks in the past.

Boat tours and canoeing

One of the best ways to see Cooloola is by boat tour, dingy or canoe along the numerous tributaries of the Noosa River. Canoes can be hired from the nearby hamlet of Boreen Point; canoe-launching sites are located at Boreen Point and inside Cooloola at Harrys Hut camping area. A tour of the river’s everglades is not to be missed. The stunning reflections are an unexpected visual delight.

Bushwalking

Fraser Island has extensive and well-marked walking trails, ranging from several short boardwalks through rainforests to strolls around a lake or longer walks across a sand blow. Wanggoolba Creek boardwalk (900-metre circuit, 30 minutes, easy), fringed with ferns and palms, is located at Central Station campsite. Rainbow Gorge Circuit (1.9 km, 1 hour, easy–moderate) leads from the eastern beach through cypress pines to the coloured sands of Rainbow Gorge. Long distance walkers will enjoy the Fraser Island Great Walk (90 km), with walkers’ camps along the way.

The numerous walks in the Cooloola section include several that start from Elanda Point on the shore of Lake Cootharaba, and four that begin at Harrys Hut camping ground. Boronia walking track (1.8 km, 1 hour) along Kin Kin Creek reveals the life of cedar cutters who worked in this area from the 1860s to the 1890s. Poona Lake Walk (4.2 km return) leaves from Bymien picnic area and leads through melaleuca woodlands, scribbly gum forests and pockets of rainforest. Cooloola has its own Cooloola Great Walk (up to 102 kilometres), with dedicated walkers' camps. There are no marked trails on Woody Island.

Fishing

Fraser Island has long been renowned for its excellent fishing. The beaches on the east coast of the island draw keen anglers for silver bream, mulloway and golden trevally, but more particularly for the huge schools of tailor that pass by on their annual migration north between July and October.

In the sheltered waters of Great Sandy Strait the target fish are barramundi, garfish, red emperor, mangrove jack, bream and sand whiting. At Cooloola, the fishing along Teewah Beach includes catches of whiting, bream and flathead, while inland river fishing is also popular. A fishing licence is not required for fishing in the tidal waters but size and bag limits apply. Call DAFF 13 7468 or visit their website (www.daff.qld.gov.au) for details.

Four-wheel driving

Fraser Island is a major 4WD beach-driving destination. Seventy-Five Mile Beach is a busy 4WD highway of sand, leading past spectacularly coloured sand cliffs, particularly impressive in the vicinity of Cathedral Beach, or stop and walk to Rainbow Gorge. Inland tracks on the island can be soft and sandy and a speed limit of 35 kilometres per hour is recommended.

At Cooloola, Teewah Beach is a straight 40 to 50-kilometre stretch of sand, easy at low tide (you must travel at this time so check the tides before departure). Do not drive on the vegetated dunes. The beach is ideal for beachcombing, camping, fishing and for marvelling at the coloured cliff-faces, and sculptured sands of Red Canyon, where iron oxides have stained the cliffs to vibrant dusty browns through yellows to crimson reds. The inland tracks of Cooloola have soft sandy sections.

Shipwrecks

Two wrecks lie sand-locked on the beaches of the national park and are especially fascinating in the soft early morning light, which turns them rustic gold. These skeletal hulls are a photographer’s delight. On Fraser, the Maheno lies just north of the mouth of Eli Creek. It was hit by a cyclone in 1935 while being towed to Japan for scrap metal. At the northern end of Teewah Beach on the Cooloola coast lies the Cherry Venture, which ran aground in a violent storm in 1973.

Whale-watching

Although outside Great Sandy National Park, Hervey Bay hugs the west coast of Fraser Island and humpback whales visit these waters from July through to early November. Australia’s premier whale-watching location, Great Sandy Marine Park protects these magnificent animals. Many operators run tours from Urangan pier, on the west side of the bay, at the height of the season.

Campsites

Burad camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach south of Corroboree Beach on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Cabbage Tree camping area (walk-in camping)

This open grassy campsite high on the Consuelo Tableland is the last stop on the recommended Carnarvon Great Walk itinerary. It is 13.8 km from Consuelo camping area and 15.3 km from the Carnarvon Gorge information... Find out more


Carree camping area (bush camping)

This semi-remote camping area at the far north of Fraser Island near Sandy Cape Lighthouse is suitable only for experienced wilderness campers. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are prohibited), and place... Find out more


Cathedrals on Fraser

This privately managed camping area, part of the Cathedrals on Fraser resort, offers some creature comforts missing from other campgrounds on the island, including fuel sales, a convenience store with bottle shop and... Find out more


Central Station camping area

This fenced family campground in central Fraser Island’s rainforest setting has 44 tent sites, 16 camper trailer sites and a group area for 20–40 people. Accessible by 4WD or hiking trails only, it is 13 km... Find out more


Consuelo camping area (walk-in camping)

High up on the Consuelo tableland – known as ‘the roof of Queensland’ – this campsite offers no facilities other than water from an underground tank (boil or treat water before drinking). Bring a... Find out more


Coolooloi Creek camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available at this area to the west of the Hook Point barge terminal on Fraser Island, accessible by 4WD or boat. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Cornwells camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach at the eastern end of Fraser Island’s central lakes scenic drive. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Dilli Village camping area

This privately managed camping area is attached to University of the Sunshine Coast’s Fraser Island Research and Learning Centre, and offers reasonable facilities enclosed within a dingo-proof fence. Bring your own... Find out more


Diray camping area (bush camping)

Semi-remote bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach south of Sandy Cape on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Dulara camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach at the northern end of Hook Point Inland Rd. Generators are prohibited and campers are required to bring a portable toilet... Find out more


Duling camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach south of Ngkala Rocks on the northern east coast of Fraser Island. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Dundubara camping area

This popular family campground on Fraser Island has 40 tent sites, 5 camper trailer sites and a separate group camping area for up to 40 people. Accessed by 4WD, it’s on the central east coast, about 75 km north of... Find out more


Eli camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach halfway between Dilli Village and Eli Creek on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove... Find out more


Eugarie camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach north of Knifeblade Sandblow on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Fig Tree Point camping area

This campground beside Lake Cootharaba in the Cooloola section has basic facilities and a maximum capacity of 25 campers. It can be reached by boat or canoe from the Noosa River, 2 km north of Kinaba, or by a 10 km walk... Find out more


Freshwater Campground

Accessible by 4WD only, this campground with 59 sites is 8 km south of Double Island Point off Teewah Beach in Great Sandy’s Cooloola section. The camping area is 500 m from the beach in scribbly gum woodland.... Find out more


Gabala camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach between Poyungan Rocks and Cornwells camping area on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel... Find out more


Gadd's camping area (walk-in camping)

This site is situated among the remains of an old cattle station, past the stunning views of Battleship Spur lookout. There are no facilities other than water from an underground tank, which must be boiled or treated... Find out more


Garrys Anchorage camping area

Unfenced campsites and picnic tables in a very quiet, remote location are 19 km south of Ungowa on Fraser Island’s south-west coast. Access is by 4WD or boat. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires... Find out more


Garulim camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach halfway between Hook Point and Dilli Village on Hook Point Inland Rd. Generators are prohibited and campers are required to... Find out more


Govi camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach north of Dilli Village on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Guluri camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach directly to the north of Happy Valley on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires... Find out more


Guruman camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach south of Dundubara camping area on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Harrys camping area

This is the only campground in the Cooloola section with vehicle (4WD only) and Upper Noosa River access. It is 10 km east of Cooloola Way on Harrys Hut Rd. Campers should be aware that goannas and brush turkeys often... Find out more


Jeffries Beach camping area (boat-based camping)

This bush campground with no facilities is the only camping area on Woody Island. You’ll find Jeffries Beach on the south-east side of the island, about 5 min south of the gas shed. Experienced sea kayakers... Find out more


Lake Boomanjin camping area (walk-in camping)

This fenced campground suitable for tent camping is in open forest between the carpark on Birrabeen Rd and Lake Boomanjin on Fraser Island. It is 6.3 km north of Dilli Village on the Fraser Island Great Walk, or 10 km... Find out more


Maheno camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach directly to the north of Eli Creek near the wreck of the SS Maheno on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water... Find out more


Marloo camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach between Orchid Beach and Ocean Lake on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires... Find out more


Midyim camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach between Dulara and Garulim on Hook Point Inland Rd. Generators are prohibited and campers are required to bring a portable... Find out more


Neebs Waterhole camping area (walk-in camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient hikers is permitted at Neebs Waterhole, 8.1 km (3 hr walk) south of Mullens carpark on Rainbow Beach Rd in the Cooloola section. It is around 12.5 km north of the Wandi Waterhole camping... Find out more


Noosa River camping area – no. 1 (boat-based camping)

Take a paddle down the Noosa River in the Cooloola section to this remote campsite, accessible only by small boat or canoe (jetty provided). It caters for a maximum of 8 campers and offers few facilities. Boil or treat... Find out more


Noosa River camping area – no. 2 (boat-based camping)

This campsite, further up the Noosa River in the Cooloola section than camping area no. 1, is similarly low-key and tranquil. It can be accessed by small boat or canoe (canoe landing area provided). It holds a maximum of... Find out more


Noosa River camping area – no. 3 (boat-based camping)

This campsite, further up the Noosa River in the Cooloola section than camping areas nos 1 and 2, marks the limit of how far motorised vessels can travel up the Noosa. It camps 25 people and has an access jetty, although... Find out more


Noosa River camping area – no. 4 (boat-based camping)

This campsite, just to the north of camping area no. 3 on the Noosa River in the Cooloola section, is the first of a series of isolated bush camps for self-sufficient campers. Accessible only by canoe (no motorised... Find out more


Noosa River camping area – no. 5 (boat-based camping)

This campsite, a few bends up the Noosa River in the Cooloola section from camping area no. 4, is the last of the riverside camping areas that the Great Walk passes by before turning north-east towards Lake Cooloomera.... Find out more


Noosa River camping area – no. 8 (boat-based camping)

This campsite is in the semi-remote north of Noosa River in the Cooloola section, 5 km north of camping area no. 5. (The numbered camping areas between are currently closed.) Like the other campsites, it has no... Find out more


Noosa River camping area – no. 9 (boat-based camping)

This campsite is in the semi-remote north of Noosa River in the Cooloola section, 1 km upstream of camping area no. 8. Like the other campsites, it has no facilities. Boil or treat the river water, or bring your own... Find out more


Noosa River camping area – no. 13 (boat-based camping)

This campsite is in the semi-remote north of Noosa River in the Cooloola section, 2 km upstream of camping area no. 9. Like the other campsites, it has no facilities. Boil or treat the river water, or bring your own... Find out more


Noosa River camping area – no. 15 (boat-based camping)

If you want to get away from it all, head far up the Noosa River in the Cooloola section to this, the final campsite on the river. Like the other campsites, it has no facilities. Boil or treat the river water, or bring... Find out more


Ocean Lake camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes between Ocean Lake and the beach on Fraser Island’s east coast. Some facilities are available at the nearby Ocean Lake day-use area. Bring... Find out more


One Tree Rocks camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach north of Eurong QPWS Information Centre on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove... Find out more


Poverty Point camping area

This simple campground overlooking Tin Can Bay is 13 km south of Rainbow Beach off Rainbow Beach Rd in the Cooloola section. Follow the 4WD access road a further 6 km to reach the site. Bring your own water and firewoood... Find out more


Poyungan camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach north of Poyungan Rocks on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Teebing camping area (bush camping)

This very large, remote camping area stretches south from Sandy Cape Lighthouse on Fraser’s west coast down to Wathumba camping area. 4WD vehicles are not permitted in this delicate area (boat or walk-in access... Find out more


Teewah Beach camping area

You can camp on Teewah Beach in the 15 km zone between Noosa Shire boundary and Little Freshwater Creek in the Cooloola section, but there are no facilities provided. Access is 4WD only, with room for off-road caravans... Find out more


Ungowa camping area

Expect plenty of open, shady spots for tents, and defined camper trailer sites, at Ungowa, 12 km south-west of Central Station on the south-west coast of Fraser Island. The facilities are relatively basic but include a... Find out more


Waddy Point camping area

The camping area at Waddy Point on Fraser Island contains a fenced clearing with 30 tent sites and 3 camper trailer sites, a fenced group-camping area for up to 40 people, and unfenced beachfront camping for 90 people.... Find out more


Wahba camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach south of The Pinnacles on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Wandi Waterhole camping area (bush camping)

Wandi has clearings for bush camping suitable for self-sufficient hikers, around 12.5 km south of Neebs Waterhole in the Cooloola section. Access is walk-in only from the Cooloola Wilderness Trail. Carry in drinking... Find out more


Wathumba camping area

Nearby mangroves ensure mosquitoes and sandflies are ever-present, especially in summer, so come prepared! There are 20 designated sites and plenty of grass at this Fraser Island site, 16 km west of Waddy Point and... Find out more


Winnam camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach south of Kirrar Sandblow on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Wongai camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach south of Eurong Beach Resort on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Wyuna camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach south of Burad camping area on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires are... Find out more


Yurru camping area (bush camping)

Bush camping for self-sufficient campers is available behind the dunes on this stretch of beach north of Cathedrals on Fraser resort on Fraser Island’s east coast. Bring drinking water and a gas/fuel stove (fires... Find out more


See Also

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