Porcupine Gorge National Park

Caravan Disabled Toilets Wildlife Camping area Four-wheel drive touring Lookout Picnic area Ranger Walking

Introduction

Looking like an oasis in the dry, flat plains north of Hughenden, Porcupine Gorge National Park features towering sandstone cliffs and a ribbon of greenery lining Porcupine Creek. Over millions of years this stream, which changes from a string of pools in winter to a cascade in the wet season, has eroded the surrounding basalt-capped sandstone into the deep gorge we see today. It has also carved sculptures and potholes in the natural rock, the most famous of which is the Pyramid, an isolated monolith of multicoloured sandstone rising from the floor of the gorge.

The park is dominated by eucalypt woodlands but the creek is lined with she-oaks and paperbarks. The creek is both an important bird habitat and a wildlife refuge in the dry season, especially for wallaroos and rock-wallabies. Birdlife drawn to the water includes currawongs, red-winged parrots, Pacific black ducks, black bitterns and honeyeaters. Gorge Lookout is a good viewpoint and picnic area. You can walk down into the gorge via the Pyramid Track (2.4 km return, 1½ hours, medium difficulty) from Pyramid campground.

Campers should be self-sufficient and bring all supplies and water with them. Bookings are essential if you wish to secure a spot, but unplanned visitors may find a self-registration campsite available. The nearby town of Hughenden has caravan, motel and hotel accommodation. The best time to visit this national park is in the cooler months of the year, as summer can be extremely hot. A 4WD vehicle is recommended in wet weather.

Fact file

Camping

One campground; permit and fees apply; bookings essential

Location and access

385 km west of Townsville; 61 km north of Hughenden via Kennedy Developmental Rd

Park information

NPRSR 13 7468

Size

5410 ha

Visitor information

Hughenden (07) 4741 2970

See Also

Campsites

Pyramid Campground

Over time, Porcupine Creek has carved sculptures and potholes in the natural rock, the most famous of which is the Pyramid, an isolated monolith of multicoloured sandstone rising from the floor of the gorge. Pyramid... Find out more


See Also

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